Loide Ndemueda

Loide 20

I first met Loide when she was in London in late 2014, when she went to Pinner.  At end-2016 she had just matriculated ( graduated) from school but was awaiting her results. She wants to study philosophy, politics and economics – she’ll need a scholarship for that – and then maybe to go on to a law degree.dsc_3450-2

We have talked a lot over the years and she developed a good relationship with Taigh when we were here last. I had never really heard her story, though, just snippets from herself and Bronwen. She had been wanting me to take her photo, being, naturally, from the selfie generation. She is a strong young woman and has a clear and determined sense of human rights, campaigning for Native American Leonard Peltier’s release from jail and for the rights of burned children. One of her many roles this past year has been to assist after shack fires and to oversee the Sunday Literacy scheme at Joe Slovo squatter camp. The kids there love her and she knows many of the community members.

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This morning she told me the story of how she was burned.

I was thirteen, living in Limpopo when I got burnt and it was probably intentional- a fight over land. The neighbours wanted to buy some land but the community refused.  The white American owners, though I don’t want this to be seen as racist- it was a particular family, got angry.  There was also a very senior South African black politician implicated.the first day after the school holidays. We could see smoke behind the houses. Everybody ran, trying to put the fire out before it caught the whole field alight. The man made a small gap in the electric fence so that he could get in and out – we thought he was helping but the fire extinguishers seemed to make the fire worse.

He started running after the kids, spraying them and they ran and tried to get over the electric fence.  It was winter but quite hot. I had jerseys and long school socks on but my sister was wearing shorts. I could hear my sister screaming so I went back to get her – I still didn’t know the cause of the fire. When someone asked the man to help and turn the fence power off, his employees were told to stay where they were. He shouted ‘it’s none of my business’.

A white woman came to help with plastic bags, water and her car and said- ‘hurry before he sees us.’  Then I believed it was an intentional attack and we had been trapped between electric fences. The ambulances came but the police didn’t.  It was alleged that the guy had paid friends in the police. Fingers and skin were left on the wire fence.

Seven children survived but ten children died, all of them my friends, and including my sister who was nine years old. I didn’t know she had died until a year later. She was in the burns unit and I was in the surgical unit. People thought it would be too stressful for me to know while I was ill.  My mum stopped coming to visit me for a while and they told me my sister had been moved to Pretoria.

Finally I was brought to Children of Fire. I was the only lucky one out of all 17, because I got so much more specialised surgery then, even a R100,000 hip replacement. I was enrolled in Greenside High School which was so much better educationally than what was available to me at home. And now I have two homes, two families, because Auckland Park has become home too.

I have travelled to Britain twice and I dream of getting a place at Oxford University but I know it will take time to improve my English for that. I wanted to stand as a ward councillor at the last elections and had enough community signatures of support for that but then knew I had to focus on my schooling first.

I researched the legal issues around my case with a French Law Student Simon Holley and we remain friends. I think that one day Simon might become President of France because he has already worked directly with the President of Canada. I am proud to know him and I think he is proud to know me. Children of Fire has given me the opportunity to work with and meet such a wide range of people. If I had not been burned, I might have been a Nobody in Vingerkraal but as I survived, now I will be a Somebody in the World.

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